Alex Grossman
Alex Grossman is Vice President of Media & Entertainment at Quantum. Alex is a 20+ year veteran of the storage industry and was previously the was Founder and President of Active Storage. Before founding Active Storage, Grossman was an Apple executive in the Worldwide Product Marketing group.

Securing and Archiving: The Overlooked Part of Metadata Management

Media content consists of both essence (the content itself) and its associated metadata. Everybody acknowledges that the metadata is important to classifying and locating content, so media companies tend to put a lot of thought into collecting and managing metadata — what type of information will be collected, where it will be entered and how often, etc. The idea is to ensure consistent, thorough metadata collection so that users can find and remonetize specific pieces of content. Metadata-gathering is a critical part of the metadata management process, to be sure, but it’s only half the process. What people tend to ignore is the other piece of metadata management — ensuring that the metadata is secure and archived. Why do they ignore it? Because media companies tend to focus so much on securing the actual content that they put little if any thought into securing the associated metadata, which is often stored in another database separate from the content itself. Let's look at best practices for protecting your metadata is to ensure that, while you’re backing up your content, you’re also backing up and archiving your metadata database.

PetaScale Storage Gets Real: Are You Ready?

The creation and acquisition of massive amounts of content has become easier than ever. With the introduction of new digital acquisition technologies (from video cameras to sensors) and increasingly sophisticated data analysis tools, the way we handle and save our data is changing. The true value of information will evolve over time. For example, real-time data and historical data can reveal unexpected results. Old video footage can be compiled and digitized from archives to capture a previously insignificant moment in time. For businesses that rely on data to identify trends or repurpose content for monetization, there is a need to keep all of this forever.