Ben Davenport | Director of Marketing at Dalet
During the past decade, Ben has played a key role in some of the most complex and progressive file-based media solutions and projects in the industry and gained a wealth of experience around file-formats, workflow and the convergence of broadcast and IT. At Dalet, Ben is responsible for the worldwide marketing initiatives across the company’s global business units & three technology platforms. Additionally, Ben has a specific focus on the creation and delivery of the lifecycle plan for the features and functionality of the Dalet AmberFin transcoding platform.

Making Things Simple: Dalet’s New Solutions at IBC

Whether it’s adding search and edit capabilities for captions and subtitles, enhancing chat and messaging modules, or publishing directly to Facebook and Twitter, Quantum partner Dalet is continuously working to streamline the content creation process with their media asset management (MAM) solutions. Quantum StorNext is tightly integrated with Dalet MAM solutions to further streamline workflows by seamlessly and automatically moving assets between disk, tape, object storage and cloud resources. Today, we’re sharing what’s new with Dalet and what they’ll be showing at IBC.

From the Dalet Academy: Shared Storage for Media Workflows, PT.1

The first time I edited any media, I did it with a razor and some sticky tape. It wasn’t a complicated edit – I was stitching together audio recordings of two movements of a Mozart piano concerto. It also wasn’t that long ago and I confess that every subsequent occasion I used a DAW (Digital Audio Workstation). I’m guessing that there aren’t many (or possibly any) readers of this blog that remember splicing video tape together (that died off with helical-scan) but there are probably a fair few who have, in the past, performed a linear edit with two or more tape machines and a switcher. Today, however, most media operations (even down to media consumption) are non-linear; this presents some interesting challenges when storing, and possibly more importantly, recalling media. To understand why this is so challenging, we first need to think about the elements of the media itself and then the way in which these elements are accessed.