Wayne Arvidson
Wayne Arvidson is Quantum’s Vice President of Video Surveillance Solutions. A seasoned global marketing, product management, and business development executive, Wayne has 25 years senior management experience in companies ranging from start-ups to Fortune 500 firms and drives Quantum’s strategy in the surveillance and security market.

What’s Ahead for Surveillance and Security Storage in 2017?

2016 saw video surveillance and security increasingly become the focus of mainstream media conversations, with video playing a pivotal role in bringing terror suspects to justice (as it did recently in NYC) and with police body worn cameras capturing sometimes controversial incidents that spark national conversations. Behind the camera, technology has continued to evolve and storage has become an even more important consideration for anyone implementing a surveillance and security system. Integrators, resellers, vendors, and end-users can look to 2017 as a time of vigorous change for video surveillance and security.

Beating the Traffic Requires Intelligent Storage

The experience of being stuck in traffic, late for an appointment, imagining alternative routes you might have taken if you’d only known what was ahead, is universal. As surveillance video finds new applications beyond traditional security purposes, improving transportation is an area a lot of people can get behind. When the City of Seattle recently faced a major highway closure, they used video surveillance to help the public find alternate routes, avoiding chaos and a significant public backlash against the project.

Will Data Storage Be the Inhibitor or Enabler of Next Generation Video Surveillance Systems?

By 2020, 3.3 trillion hours of video will be captured globally, generating 859 PB of data. In my meetings with customers looking to implement new video surveillance systems, I’ve seen a great deal of enthusiasm for the possibilities the latest camera technologies offer, as well as for the opportunities to leverage innovative new analysis tools. These conversations have changed substantially over just a couple of years, as new use cases for video surveillance have emerged. Organizations are just starting to understand the fact that they’ll need a more sophisticated approach to storage if they want to make full use of the new tools available to them and cope with longer retention requirements, all while keeping the total cost of ownership manageable. The storage approach they choose can either become the limiting factor for what they want their system to accomplish, or it can enable video surveillance to become a true business asset. In a new whitepaper, Josh Woodhouse, a senior analyst with IHS, explores the key considerations for implementing storage to support a modern video surveillance infrastructure.

Drive Time on the Beltway – Talking Body Worn Video

Almost daily there is a story about the demand for body worn video devices to be used by law enforcement agencies across the globe. There is also a lot of discussion about the Federal funding available to US police departments for this new camera technology – in May this year the Justice Department announced $20 million in grants, towards the $75 million the Obama administration requested over three years. What this funding doesn’t cover - and the biggest challenge faced by agencies in implementation - is how to build out a storage infrastructure to manage and protect the vast amount of data these devices produce. This challenge is compounded by new devices that support higher resolutions and are used by increasing numbers of officers per department. There is a solution, which if implemented can help departments across the globe speed up the adoption of this technology and valuable tool. Quantum's Wayne Arvidson, Vice President of Surveillance Solutions, recently sat down with Tom Temin on his “Federal Drive” program for Federal News Radio to discuss how to solve the challenges of body worn devices.