When Will Tape Cease To Be Relevant? Probably Never.

Over the past few weeks, I’ve been updating a number of technical documents about how LTO-7 and soon to be released LTO-8 have made quantum leaps in both capacity (recording density) and data reliability. During this process, I thought back to the days of old when we old-timers were just getting started, before data storage became a specialty. It’s somewhat mind-boggling how far data recording has progressed in recent years. Back in the day, the maximum data capacity of a 2,400-foot 9-track tape reel, recorded at 6,250 BPI was 170 MB. Today LTO-7 recording density is 19,107 bits/mm, which equates to 477,675 BPI, providing 6 TB per cartridge on a 3,400-foot piece of media—and LTO-8 is projected to have 12 TB per cartridge. Truly amazing!

Avoid Tears from a WannaCry Ransomware Attack: Follow the 3, 2, 1 Backup Rule for your Company’s Data Center.

Major companies, healthcare organizations, and individuals were hit this weekend by the newest ransomware attack—WannaCry. WannaCry affected an exploit in the Windows XP operating system on PCs. Microsoft shortly sent out a fix for the security flaw, but authorities warn that many more cases may come to light in the following weeks.

The World is Ready for a Better Tape Platform

In the age of the exploding Galaxy S7 and Spotify cyber attacks, I’d like to take a moment to salute a workhorse in my personal technology stable — my iPod. Since 1998, this little beauty has been humming along with the same battery (!) on ski days, backpacking trips, trail runs, bike rides, and cross-country flights. It carries over 4,000 songs hand-curated, primarily from the (ahem) Boulder Public Library. It helps me save the battery life on my iPhone and keeps me in music when I’m out of reach for Pandora or Spotify. Yes, the Amazon Echo is amazing, but the content on my old iPod still has value, and there’s still a place for it in my multi-tiered music strategy. You have to appreciate technology that just works.

Want More Funk in Your Splunk? Keep More Junk in Your Trunk.

Collection and analysis of large data sets is perennially hot. Remember Data Warehouses? ‘Big Data’ is just the latest buzzword for this trend. Admit it - it’s an alluring vision. Supposedly just save enough data and apply the right tools, and insight (and money) will rain from the clouds. Though frequently clothed in breathless hype, there is a kernel of truth here. You can find insight in rivers of data if you have the right tools. Organizations across a range of industries are successfully capturing and analyzing oceans of machine- and sensor-generated data with Splunk.

The Cloud Rush of 2016

Many companies are getting caught up in the hype of moving to the cloud, and in their initial pursuit they discover some of the hidden issues and costs that are otherwise not obvious. There are many services of great value in the public cloud: software, storage, infrastructure, and more, and the development of these services has triggered a rush to the cloud. However, just because we can outsource these services doesn’t mean that we always should, as noted in a recent article.

Artico Active Archive in a Workflow World

When we set out to do a lab validation of the Artico active archive appliance with industry analyst ESG, it felt like we were entering somewhat uncharted territory. We’ve done plenty of lab validations with ESG before – primarily with various models of DXi – but Artico is a different animal, it occupies a different place in the data center, and it breaks with so many traditional approaches to data archive, we had to wonder if ESG would “get it.”

Active Archive Alliance: State of the Industry – Good Progress, More Work Ahead

Last week the Active Archive Alliance announced the availability of a report titled “Active Archive and the State of the Industry”. The report is primarily an educational piece, explaining the data growth challenge IT organizations are facing today, and then defining archive characteristics, showing how active archives are implemented and illustrating the resulting benefits.

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