The Untold Stories Behind Security

The apparatus of security is something that can be easily taken for granted. We may grumble about taking our shoes off at an airport security line, or having our bag searched on the way into a concert, but we largely accept these inconveniences as the price of security. The infrastructure that is necessary to make us all feel secure in order to conduct business, travel, and live our lives freely is vastly more complex than many of us typically think about. At the ASIS International 61st Annual Seminar and Exhibits last week in Anaheim the world’s experts in security management gathered to share insights on what it takes to mitigate risk and maintain security. These are the guys who think about security every day and never take it for granted. Experts presented on topics such as “The Future Effects of Rapidly Changing Security Technology” and “Living the New Normal of Sophisticated and Determined Attackers.” I listened to the head of security at The Mall of America describe behavior detection and assessment, and how they have responded when the mall was specifically mentioned in a terrorist threat video. He recounted some specific successes you probably haven’t heard about because security successes don’t make the news – security failures do.

Will Data Storage Be the Inhibitor or Enabler of Next Generation Video Surveillance Systems?

By 2020, 3.3 trillion hours of video will be captured globally, generating 859 PB of data. In my meetings with customers looking to implement new video surveillance systems, I’ve seen a great deal of enthusiasm for the possibilities the latest camera technologies offer, as well as for the opportunities to leverage innovative new analysis tools. These conversations have changed substantially over just a couple of years, as new use cases for video surveillance have emerged. Organizations are just starting to understand the fact that they’ll need a more sophisticated approach to storage if they want to make full use of the new tools available to them and cope with longer retention requirements, all while keeping the total cost of ownership manageable. The storage approach they choose can either become the limiting factor for what they want their system to accomplish, or it can enable video surveillance to become a true business asset. In a new whitepaper, Josh Woodhouse, a senior analyst with IHS, explores the key considerations for implementing storage to support a modern video surveillance infrastructure.

Is Data The New Weapon Against Cyber Attacks?

Cybersecurity is in the news and for good reason. Many of us have experienced firsthand what cybercriminals can do with our credit card numbers and our personally identifiable information being sold on the black market. In government, though, the stakes are higher. So it shouldn’t be a surprise that cybersecurity is on GAO’s High Risk List. Vulnerabilities abound in today’s technology-dependent world, and cybercriminals excel at exploiting weakness. Fortunately there are weapons organizations can deploy to fight back, and they fall into three main categories: people, tools, and data.

Drive Time on the Beltway – Talking Body Worn Video

Almost daily there is a story about the demand for body worn video devices to be used by law enforcement agencies across the globe. There is also a lot of discussion about the Federal funding available to US police departments for this new camera technology – in May this year the Justice Department announced $20 million in grants, towards the $75 million the Obama administration requested over three years. What this funding doesn’t cover - and the biggest challenge faced by agencies in implementation - is how to build out a storage infrastructure to manage and protect the vast amount of data these devices produce. This challenge is compounded by new devices that support higher resolutions and are used by increasing numbers of officers per department. There is a solution, which if implemented can help departments across the globe speed up the adoption of this technology and valuable tool. Quantum's Wayne Arvidson, Vice President of Surveillance Solutions, recently sat down with Tom Temin on his “Federal Drive” program for Federal News Radio to discuss how to solve the challenges of body worn devices.

Storage as the Foundation of Body Camera Programs

If you were building a police department from the ground up, where would you begin? Where do you go to stock up on holsters, handcuffs, badges, flashlights, guns, dispatch centers, in-car computers, police cars and the myriad other gear required by modern law enforcement? A good place to start is the Police Security Expo, held this year in Atlantic City. It’s like a superstore for police. And Quantum was there, because police departments increasingly need to include storage on their shopping list. This was my chance to check out the latest on-body cameras that have been in the news so much lately. Think of something about the size of a GoPro, but even more heavy duty, and sophisticated enough to actually begin recording 10 seconds before you press Record. The vendors selling these cameras typically had a good crowd of officers being educated on what it’s like to live with them on a daily basis, and the question of storage always came up. It’s a good thing, because law enforcement agencies are routinely generating over 1PB of data a year.

Connecting Dots This Week At GEOINT2015

I’m on my way to Washington, D.C. for the GEOINT 2015 Symposium. I’m looking forward to spending time with customers and GEOINT’ers, along with the rest of the Quantum team. If you’re at the event, drop by Quantum booth #8058 to learn about the latest techniques in geospatial data management. I’m especially excited to attend GEOINT this year because I’ve been selected to give a Lightning Talk at the GEOINT Foreword Pre-Symposium. I will have 5 short minutes to tell a technology story and keep the audience engaged. No pressure. The title of my talk is: “Connecting Dots In Today’s World—Crayons Not Included.” Why focus on “connecting dots?" Well, the goal in GEOINT today is the same as ever: to derive useful intelligence from data. And while innovation is everywhere—in small sats, in 4K video, in sensors, in mobile, and in the analytics and data viz software that enables discovery—all this innovation is creating a ton of data that needs to be managed, analyzed, and connected. So it makes sense to talk about the challenges people face connecting all of these dots. And the bigger challenge they face recognizing which patterns of connected dots are meaningful.

The Third Era of Data (and Storage) – At the Center of the Universe

Quantum is ringing the closing bell at the New York Stock Exchange today in celebration of its 35th anniversary this year, so I’ve been thinking recently about the history of the storage business. It’s been a very interesting ride. Most extraordinary is the degree to which the role of data storage has changed. Data storage have moved from the edge of the data processing universe to being firmly at the core. Data storage has gone from being a peripheral playing a supporting role to being the belle of the IT ball. It’s an exciting time (again) to be in the data storage industry, particularly for Quantum because of the central role our StorNext scale-out storage solutions have long played in enabling customers to organize, protect and manage their data so they can leverage it for strategic advantage. As Quantum commemorates its 35th anniversary, we look forward to helping more organizations maximize the value of their data.

7 Questions About Incident Response Every CISO Must Be Able To Answer

Anybody who has anything has something worth stealing. Today’s advanced cybersecurity threats are putting CISOs on the hot seat. And while detection and prevention remain the staples of security, effective incident response has become critical to the bottom line. When (not if) you are breached—how will you investigate, and how will you respond? This post explores 7 important questions that every Chief Information Security Officer must be able to answer about incident response.

Tips On How To Prepare for a Data Breach

The cybersecurity headlines have gotten bigger, bolder, and more prevalent as 2014 draws to a close. Not surprisingly, as a result of these costly cyber incidents, there has been much discussion about how to prevent—how to detect—and how to prepare for cyber attacks, including my recent article in InformationWeek’s Wall Street & Technology: "5 Tips On How To Prepare For A Data Breach."

7 Things the Beltway Can Learn from Hollywood About Video Workflows

Video is not just for entertainment anymore. It’s transforming how people communicate in corporations, in universities—and in government organizations. I returned home last Thursday night from the Government Video Expo in Washington D.C., where our days were chock-full of conversations with the people who create video for defense and civilian agencies alike. One highlight at the 2014 #GVExpo was Geoff Stedman’s talk ‘The 7 Things the Beltway Can Learn from Hollywood About Video Workflows.’

Government Video is Growing Like a Weed

The human brain is wired for conversation. And it’s also wired for beauty—we appreciate art and sunsets and gorgeous landscapes, architecture and racecars and winning jump shots. Perhaps that’s what makes video so powerful—it combines conversation with beautiful images. Our brains are wired for this combination of imagery and conversation, and the result is something that engages us. Today’s advances in camera, post-production, and broadcast technologies make it easier than ever to create super engaging content with video. It’s no wonder that digital storytelling is growing in both corporate America and government organizations—it gets the job done. Video tells a powerful story.

Is Network Traffic Data Better than Gold?

The theft of credit card and personal identity information is big business. We’ve all seen the headlines about data breaches at Target, Home Depot, and JPMorgan Chase. At JPMorgan Chase, personal information for 83 million households and small businesses was stolen, including names, addresses, phone numbers, and emails. The theft of this personal information is not only expensive to JPMorgan Chase (and its insurers), and not only upsetting for all the people impacted—it can also lead to more cyber attacks in the future, since personal information helps cybercriminals better target individuals. To investigate a cyber attack, you need to be able to look back in time and figure out what happened: how did the attackers get in the door? Where did they go, and what did they take once they got inside?

Telling the StorNext 5 Story

I love telling the StorNext 5 story. It’s satisfying to see a customer sit up straighter in their chair when the light bulb goes off, when they grasp what StorNext can do for them. To see them lean forward when they figure out how StorNext can address their challenges managing high-performance workflows, at scale, within budget. Without dropping a packet. Without dropping a frame. This week we rolled out a new and compelling set of StorNext 5 Scale-out Storage pages on our Quantum dot com website. If you already know and love StorNext 5, I hope you will think we did it justice. If you are wondering what StorNext 5 is, I hope the new pages answer your questions—clearly and cogently.

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