Drive Time on the Beltway – Talking Body Worn Video

Almost daily there is a story about the demand for body worn video devices to be used by law enforcement agencies across the globe. There is also a lot of discussion about the Federal funding available to US police departments for this new camera technology – in May this year the Justice Department announced $20 million in grants, towards the $75 million the Obama administration requested over three years. What this funding doesn’t cover - and the biggest challenge faced by agencies in implementation - is how to build out a storage infrastructure to manage and protect the vast amount of data these devices produce. This challenge is compounded by new devices that support higher resolutions and are used by increasing numbers of officers per department. There is a solution, which if implemented can help departments across the globe speed up the adoption of this technology and valuable tool. Quantum's Wayne Arvidson, Vice President of Surveillance Solutions, recently sat down with Tom Temin on his “Federal Drive” program for Federal News Radio to discuss how to solve the challenges of body worn devices.

7 Things the Beltway Can Learn from Hollywood About Video Workflows

Video is not just for entertainment anymore. It’s transforming how people communicate in corporations, in universities—and in government organizations. I returned home last Thursday night from the Government Video Expo in Washington D.C., where our days were chock-full of conversations with the people who create video for defense and civilian agencies alike. One highlight at the 2014 #GVExpo was Geoff Stedman’s talk ‘The 7 Things the Beltway Can Learn from Hollywood About Video Workflows.’

Government Video is Growing Like a Weed

The human brain is wired for conversation. And it’s also wired for beauty—we appreciate art and sunsets and gorgeous landscapes, architecture and racecars and winning jump shots. Perhaps that’s what makes video so powerful—it combines conversation with beautiful images. Our brains are wired for this combination of imagery and conversation, and the result is something that engages us. Today’s advances in camera, post-production, and broadcast technologies make it easier than ever to create super engaging content with video. It’s no wonder that digital storytelling is growing in both corporate America and government organizations—it gets the job done. Video tells a powerful story.

ACRI-ST Relies on StorNext 5 to Preserve Environmental Data for Mankind

ACRI-ST, a space agency partner of the European Commission and the European Space Agency, provides satellite mission solutions, including simulations and environmental forecast prototyping, and operates environmental data centers that provide vital decision-making support to public agencies and local authorities. To manage and preserve the massive amount of valuable sensor data collected by Sentinel-3, ACRI-ST chose a Quantum StorNext 5 scale-out storage system. StorNext is a proven, cost-effective choice for these types of hard data management challenges that require scale, speed, and sharing.

Talking Network Forensics and Cybersecurity on Federal News Radio

My Fed colleagues tell me that their favorite morning news station for the D.C. beltway commute is Federal News Radio (1500 on your AM dial). So I was thrilled when I was invited to talk to Tom Temin on the “Federal Drive” morning news show about Cybersecurity and Network Forensics. With the latest Home Depot breach still fresh in the news, we talked about the growing awareness that breaches are going to happen, and the importance of putting robust incident response plans in place—in advance.

Police Body Cameras – Managing Data Storage for an Extra Set of Eyes

Recent very public incidents involving residents and police have sparked a conversation of the value of equipping police with on-body video surveillance—not for security monitoring, but to provide law enforcement and citizens with a single source of truth. Cambridge University recently completed a study of the police department in Rialto, California—a city of about 100,000—where they saw an 89% reduction in the number of complaints against officers in a year-long trial using body cameras. Without accurate video evidence taken at the point of an incident, it becomes almost impossible to know what really happened. And in the absence of visual proof, assumptions run wild and events can spiral out of control.

Shining a Light on Government Information Workflows

Working with our federal customers and sales team to solve complex storage challenges, it’s become clear to me that government agencies are under pressure to modernize their storage infrastructure. No more silos. No more stovepipes. Yes to collaboration. Agencies face a bevy of challenges: massive data growth, shrinking budgets, increased user expectations—as well as technology advances in sensors, analytics, mobile, and cloud—all of which stress traditional IT. To modernize storage infrastructure (and to do it effectively) involves a spectrum of different tools and techniques: e.g. converging backup & archive—consolidating data centers—taking advantage of new cloud technologies—and mixing tiers of flash, disk, object, cloud, and tape to enable collaboration, within budget, at scale.