What My Used Car Taught Me About Scale-out NAS

I recently found myself in need of a new vehicle. It wasn’t necessarily because my old one was breaking down or in bad shape. My situation had simply changed over time such that the car I now have no longer meets my needs. In my case, I needed more room for a growing family and wanted better gas mileage. Unfortunately, the car wasn’t designed to easily or inexpensively make those improvements. It also started to cost me a lot more to maintain. This got me thinking about the similarities with legacy scale-out NAS solutions.

Think “Data Management,” Not Just “Data Protection”

Today, everyone seems to understand the ever-growing importance of data protection, often viewing it as a superset of backup combined with snapshots and replication. Typically, a conversation about data protection includes the assumption of a “gold standard” centered on using secondary disk for rapid recovery and tertiary tape for long term retention. Of course, “the cloud” also is always a consideration as part of the next generation of the solution. It’s still all under the banner of “data protection” (DP), the collection of activities, methods, and media used to help recover or restore business information after a crisis or other IT disruption. According to research, primary storage is growing around 40% annually, with secondary storage used for data protection growing at similar rates. Budgets aren’t growing nearly that much. Meanwhile, IT organizations are being asked to do more (i.e., inject more agility, functionality, and resiliency into their operations) while spending as little budget money as possible. In actuality, data protection budgets are growing around 4.6% annually according to ESG research, but that level of increase won’t even let you keep doing what you have been doing at a larger scale.Therefore, you have to do something different. What you should do: ARCHIVE!

From the Dalet Academy: Shared Storage Workflows, PT.2

Video editing has always placed higher demands on storage than any other file-based applications, and with today’s higher resolution formats, streaming video content demands even more performance from storage systems, with 4K raw requiring 1210 MB/sec per stream—7.3 times more throughput than raw HD. In the early days of non-linear editing, this level of performance could only be achieved with direct attached storage (DAS). As technology progressed, we were able to add shared collaboration even with many HD streams. Unfortunately, with the extreme demands of 4K and beyond, many workflows are resorting to DAS again, despite its drawbacks. With DAS, sharing large media files between editors and moving the content through the workflow means copying the files across the network or on reusable media such as individual USB and Thunderbolt-attached hard drives. That’s not only expensive because it duplicates the storage capacity required; it also diminishes user productivity and can break version control protocols. In this blog, we'll look the key differences between major storage technologies and well as general usage recommendations.

Reasons to Upgrade to StorNext 5: Liquid Metadata

When you work in a StorNext collaborative environment every day, you can take for granted what goes on behind the scenes to make its cross-platform, simultaneous workflows possible. How do you manage user access and file transfers to the shared storage seamlessly? It turns out that managing users wanting to access to files on a shared resource is one of the hardest computer challenges and a direct, high-performance, controlled group access to shared folders requires a Storage Area Network or SAN. The way StorNext delivers this "magic" is by ensuring that a highly redundant ‘controller' managers the users, permissions and file traffic. And with the recent release of StorNext 5, the critical area of storing and managing this metadata received a dramatic performance improvement thanks to three main innovations.

The Boundary Between Primary Data and Archive Data Has Blurred

Contrary to popular belief, how you archive matters more than what or why you archive. For the broad market, the notion of non-archived data has become antiquated. Getting rid of old data means taking the time or investing in resources required to decide what data can be deleted, and most data managers do not feel comfortable making those decisions. So today virtually everything is being stored forever, generating huge repositories of data and content, and creating a great urgency to establish a data storage architecture that will thrive in this new “store everything forever” era.

NAS and SAN: Two Solutions for Shared File-Based Workflow Storage

Many companies in the Media and Entertainment industry come to us for help with their storage needs. Because video editing places higher demands on storage than any other file-based application, it requires high-performance shared storage systems. Usually this leads to one of two options: either shared Storage Area Network (SAN) file systems or scale-out Network Attached Storage (NAS) file systems. Each system offers advantages and disadvantages that should be carefully considered.