Is Data The New Weapon Against Cyber Attacks?

Cybersecurity is in the news and for good reason. Many of us have experienced firsthand what cybercriminals can do with our credit card numbers and our personally identifiable information being sold on the black market. In government, though, the stakes are higher. So it shouldn’t be a surprise that cybersecurity is on GAO’s High Risk List. Vulnerabilities abound in today’s technology-dependent world, and cybercriminals excel at exploiting weakness. Fortunately there are weapons organizations can deploy to fight back, and they fall into three main categories: people, tools, and data.

Is Network Traffic Data Better than Gold?

The theft of credit card and personal identity information is big business. We’ve all seen the headlines about data breaches at Target, Home Depot, and JPMorgan Chase. At JPMorgan Chase, personal information for 83 million households and small businesses was stolen, including names, addresses, phone numbers, and emails. The theft of this personal information is not only expensive to JPMorgan Chase (and its insurers), and not only upsetting for all the people impacted—it can also lead to more cyber attacks in the future, since personal information helps cybercriminals better target individuals. To investigate a cyber attack, you need to be able to look back in time and figure out what happened: how did the attackers get in the door? Where did they go, and what did they take once they got inside?