Developing A Winning Storage Strategy To Support University Sports Video

More and more universities are assembling on-campus video production teams to meet rising demand for video content. From admissions offices and alumni associations to research teams and campus security, an array of departments are working with video production teams to create professional-quality media and manage content meant to promote the university, advance research, and help protect people and property.

5 Ways Sports Stays Ahead of the Game in Content Production

It’s no secret that the stakes are high in sports broadcast. As Quantum’s Skip Levens said, there are “no second takes, millions of highly discriminating and knowledgeable customers scrutinizing your every move, and every play has the potential to make history.” There’s a lot of money to be made, but the competition between networks can be as fierce as anything on the road, field, court or diamond. So it’s no surprise that sports production pushes the envelope when it comes to adopting new technology. We’re only halfway through 2015 and we’ve seen some amazing leaps forward this year, in five key areas: Higher Definition Content, Camera Ubiquity, Real-time Data Analysis, In-Stadium Screens, and Live In-Home Experiences.

The Evolution of Sports Broadcasting

What industry has the most demanding workflow? There are some good contenders, and Sports Broadcasting is among the heavyweights. Capturing the drama and excitement of live sports has become the ultimate high-wire act in modern television production. Consider the pressures of covering a live event with no second takes, millions of highly discriminating and knowledgeable customers scrutinizing your every move, and that every play has the potential to make history. Take a look at the "Evolution of Sports Broadcasting" and see for yourself where the future of the industry is headed.

A Picture Is Worth A Thousand Points

Video has long been a staple of sports—it’s used for scouting, game prep, recruiting and promotion, as well as broadcasting—but two factors are making it different now. One is the technology for analyzing what’s on video. One of the biggest trends in sports is motion analysis, which combines special analytics applications and video to help players improve their performance by breaking down and evaluating their movements. In addition to motion analysis technology, there are also now programs that can comb through years of footage to find trends based on very sophisticated variables—specific players, coaches, and situations—and extract clips to let coaches and players analyze tendencies and put together a game plan.