Will Data Storage Be the Inhibitor or Enabler of Next Generation Video Surveillance Systems?

By 2020, 3.3 trillion hours of video will be captured globally, generating 859 PB of data. In my meetings with customers looking to implement new video surveillance systems, I’ve seen a great deal of enthusiasm for the possibilities the latest camera technologies offer, as well as for the opportunities to leverage innovative new analysis tools. These conversations have changed substantially over just a couple of years, as new use cases for video surveillance have emerged. Organizations are just starting to understand the fact that they’ll need a more sophisticated approach to storage if they want to make full use of the new tools available to them and cope with longer retention requirements, all while keeping the total cost of ownership manageable. The storage approach they choose can either become the limiting factor for what they want their system to accomplish, or it can enable video surveillance to become a true business asset. In a new whitepaper, Josh Woodhouse, a senior analyst with IHS, explores the key considerations for implementing storage to support a modern video surveillance infrastructure.