Quantum Blog

What’s Happening at IBC: Autodesk Flame Demo

In our second feature of the blog series What’s Happening at IBC, we’re spotlighting our valued partner, Autodesk, a leader in 3D design, engineering, and entertainment software. We’re excited to have Autodesk join us at IBC2017 to demo Autodesk Flame in a collaborative, shared storage environment. Stop by our booth (7.B27) for a personal demo.

“Soylent Green” and the Cloud

Recently, I climbed on stage to moderate a panel discussion on “infrastructure vs. cloud” at the Technology in Government conference in Canberra, Australia. My panelists ranged from first-line government IT managers to heavy hitters like Barbara Cohn, the first chief data officer of New York state.

Automation Is Awesome—Except When It’s Not

I’m a fan of automation from way back. Growing up, my dad sold factory automation systems, and dinnertime conversation regularly included stories about robots and automated assembly lines. What kid doesn’t like robots? It’s probably fate that I ended up working for Quantum, the market share leader in open systems tape automation for as long as I can remember.

When Will Tape Cease To Be Relevant? Probably Never.

Over the past few weeks, I’ve been updating a number of technical documents about how LTO-7 and soon to be released LTO-8 have made quantum leaps in both capacity (recording density) and data reliability. During this process, I thought back to the days of old when we old-timers were just getting started, before data storage became a specialty. It’s somewhat mind-boggling how far data recording has progressed in recent years. Back in the day, the maximum data capacity of a 2,400-foot 9-track tape reel, recorded at 6,250 BPI was 170 MB. Today LTO-7 recording density is 19,107 bits/mm, which equates to 477,675 BPI, providing 6 TB per cartridge on a 3,400-foot piece of media—and LTO-8 is projected to have 12 TB per cartridge. Truly amazing!

The Unusual Trend In Healthcare Facility Workplace Violence

Workplace violence is declining nationally, so why is it increasing in healthcare facilities? Each year, there are fewer and fewer reported nonfatal workplace incidents and homicides, according to a report published by the Bureau of Justice Statistics. However, Advisory Board reported that 75 percent of all workplace assaults happen in healthcare facilities. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration categorizes several risk factors for violence in healthcare facilities.