Think “Data Management,” Not Just “Data Protection”

Today, everyone seems to understand the ever-growing importance of data protection, often viewing it as a superset of backup combined with snapshots and replication. Typically, a conversation about data protection includes the assumption of a “gold standard” centered on using secondary disk for rapid recovery and tertiary tape for long term retention. Of course, “the cloud” also is always a consideration as part of the next generation of the solution. It’s still all under the banner of “data protection” (DP), the collection of activities, methods, and media used to help recover or restore business information after a crisis or other IT disruption. According to research, primary storage is growing around 40% annually, with secondary storage used for data protection growing at similar rates. Budgets aren’t growing nearly that much. Meanwhile, IT organizations are being asked to do more (i.e., inject more agility, functionality, and resiliency into their operations) while spending as little budget money as possible. In actuality, data protection budgets are growing around 4.6% annually according to ESG research, but that level of increase won’t even let you keep doing what you have been doing at a larger scale.Therefore, you have to do something different. What you should do: ARCHIVE!

Securing and Archiving: The Overlooked Part of Metadata Management

Media content consists of both essence (the content itself) and its associated metadata. Everybody acknowledges that the metadata is important to classifying and locating content, so media companies tend to put a lot of thought into collecting and managing metadata — what type of information will be collected, where it will be entered and how often, etc. The idea is to ensure consistent, thorough metadata collection so that users can find and remonetize specific pieces of content. Metadata-gathering is a critical part of the metadata management process, to be sure, but it’s only half the process. What people tend to ignore is the other piece of metadata management — ensuring that the metadata is secure and archived. Why do they ignore it? Because media companies tend to focus so much on securing the actual content that they put little if any thought into securing the associated metadata, which is often stored in another database separate from the content itself. Let's look at best practices for protecting your metadata is to ensure that, while you’re backing up your content, you’re also backing up and archiving your metadata database.