Broadcast, Cable, IP: Which Will Win the Race to 4K Ultra HD Delivery?

As much as technology companies would like to believe that they are serving a global market, in reality tech adoption varies widely by region. What happens in London isn’t always what happens in Toronto, much less what happens in Seoul or Mumbai. The adoption of 4K is happening much faster than it did for HD, even though 4K is pulling along other data-intensive technologies: high dynamic range (HDR), high frame rates (HFR) and 10-bit or greater color depth. Now that 4K displays are available worldwide, the question turns to 4K Ultra HD content delivery: by broadcast, by cable, by satellite, or by IP? This challenge is even greater in Asia, where content delivery varies more by locale than in other regions.

From the Dalet Academy: Shared Storage Workflows, PT.2

Video editing has always placed higher demands on storage than any other file-based applications, and with today’s higher resolution formats, streaming video content demands even more performance from storage systems, with 4K raw requiring 1210 MB/sec per stream—7.3 times more throughput than raw HD. In the early days of non-linear editing, this level of performance could only be achieved with direct attached storage (DAS). As technology progressed, we were able to add shared collaboration even with many HD streams. Unfortunately, with the extreme demands of 4K and beyond, many workflows are resorting to DAS again, despite its drawbacks. With DAS, sharing large media files between editors and moving the content through the workflow means copying the files across the network or on reusable media such as individual USB and Thunderbolt-attached hard drives. That’s not only expensive because it duplicates the storage capacity required; it also diminishes user productivity and can break version control protocols. In this blog, we'll look the key differences between major storage technologies and well as general usage recommendations.

From the Dalet Academy: Shared Storage for Media Workflows, PT.1

The first time I edited any media, I did it with a razor and some sticky tape. It wasn’t a complicated edit – I was stitching together audio recordings of two movements of a Mozart piano concerto. It also wasn’t that long ago and I confess that every subsequent occasion I used a DAW (Digital Audio Workstation). I’m guessing that there aren’t many (or possibly any) readers of this blog that remember splicing video tape together (that died off with helical-scan) but there are probably a fair few who have, in the past, performed a linear edit with two or more tape machines and a switcher. Today, however, most media operations (even down to media consumption) are non-linear; this presents some interesting challenges when storing, and possibly more importantly, recalling media. To understand why this is so challenging, we first need to think about the elements of the media itself and then the way in which these elements are accessed.

Pt. 1 of Three Trends That Could Disrupt Your Workflow in 2015: 4K

In the fast-paced entertainment industry, the technology for both creating and consuming content can shift sharply and quickly. Making the right technology choices, at the right time, with well-timed implementation can mean the difference in moving your business forward or wasting a lot of time and budget fixing bad decisions, or worse, losing the business. These three market trends have the power to disrupt your workflow, but by making a few key decisions today you can transition smoothly in 2015, plus prepare for what’s to come in the future. In Pt.1 of the series we look at a technology that's going to be on everyone's mind at NAB 2015: 4K.