Broadcast, Cable, IP: Which Will Win the Race to 4K Ultra HD Delivery?

As much as technology companies would like to believe that they are serving a global market, in reality tech adoption varies widely by region. What happens in London isn’t always what happens in Toronto, much less what happens in Seoul or Mumbai. The adoption of 4K is happening much faster than it did for HD, even though 4K is pulling along other data-intensive technologies: high dynamic range (HDR), high frame rates (HFR) and 10-bit or greater color depth. Now that 4K displays are available worldwide, the question turns to 4K Ultra HD content delivery: by broadcast, by cable, by satellite, or by IP? This challenge is even greater in Asia, where content delivery varies more by locale than in other regions.

5 Ways Sports Stays Ahead of the Game in Content Production

It’s no secret that the stakes are high in sports broadcast. As Quantum’s Skip Levens said, there are “no second takes, millions of highly discriminating and knowledgeable customers scrutinizing your every move, and every play has the potential to make history.” There’s a lot of money to be made, but the competition between networks can be as fierce as anything on the road, field, court or diamond. So it’s no surprise that sports production pushes the envelope when it comes to adopting new technology. We’re only halfway through 2015 and we’ve seen some amazing leaps forward this year, in five key areas: Higher Definition Content, Camera Ubiquity, Real-time Data Analysis, In-Stadium Screens, and Live In-Home Experiences.

Field Report – HDR Video at the Hollywood Post Alliance Tech Retreat

At the recent Hollywood Post Alliance Tech Retreat the conversations and reporting centered on the expected technologies: 4K/UHD, laser cinema projection and the latest cameras. But one topic was a surprise: HDR video. This kind of ‘better than real life’ imagery is exactly what creative professionals are looking for. Imagine this complete range of dynamic lighting for imagery applied to an entire clip of video and you start to see why people are excited. But can this HDR technique be applied to post and broadcast video workflows?