Why Quantum Should Be On Your Shortlist of Disk Vendors to Consider

We could spend our days reading nothing but analyst reports, independent articles, and vendor white papers that cover the market and specific products as we try to understand what is coming next and how we are going to deal with it. But that wouldn’t leave much time for our day jobs. Check out the analyses from Gartner and Enterprise Strategy Group (ESG) below for the “Cliff Notes” version of why Quantum QXS™ should make the short list of products you consider for your next disk purchase.

Challengers Try Harder

I remember when Avis used to market themselves as “When you’re #2, you try harder.” That’s what popped into my head when I learned of our position as a Challenger in Gartner’s Magic Quadrant General-Purpose Disk Array report. A Challenger in Gartner’s vernacular is a vendor that “executes well enough to be a serious threat to vendors in the Leaders quadrant. They have strong products, as well as sufficient credible market position and resources to sustain continued growth. Financial viability is not an issue for vendors in the Challengers quadrant, but they lack the size and influence of vendors in the Leaders quadrant.” Check out these recent articles on the Gartner Magic Quadrant report: The Register and StorageNewsletter.com.

Quantum QXS Hybrid Flash Storage Named a Challenger in the Latest Gartner Magic Quadrant Report

Gartner’s Magic Quadrant for General-Purpose Disk Arrays report was released on Halloween, and it was anything but scary news. Quantum QXS™ flash hybrid storage was positioned by Gartner as a Challenger—it’s the first time that we have been included in this Magic Quadrant report. Achieving a Challenger position is great news! Chris Mellor, storage editor for The Register, concludes the reaction from prospects will be, "Hey boss, your shortlist just got longer." You can read Mellor’s entire article in The Register. For a detailed overview of the market players, check out this article in StorageNewsletter.com.

The Impact of Video Evidence on Retention Policies

This month, I attended Security Canada — the largest surveillance and security show north of the United States. The show floor was bustling with security integrators, end users, and even students from nearby universities hoping to learn more about the security industry. Inspired by the students, I decided to sit in on a couple of sessions to learn more about the surveillance and security market, and particularly how it differs in Canada compared to the United States. One particular session piqued my interest, Video Surveillance and the Law. Expecting to learn about the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, I instead listened to the unique perspective of a lawyer who is well-versed in cases focused on surveillance and video evidence.

Life as a Security System Integrator

Did you know that the global market for security system integrators will grow to $75.7 billion by 2020, up from $60.3 billion in 2015 (source: IHS Markit)? It only makes sense that just as the security and surveillance industry continues to transform with the move to higher resolution cameras, longer data retention times, and the increase in usage of analytics, that the security system integrators market would also transform. What these integrators may have built their business on—manned guarding, alarm and fire detection, and so on — is quickly changing to focus more on the technology solutions they can provide to their customers.

The World is Ready for a Better Tape Platform

In the age of the exploding Galaxy S7 and Spotify cyber attacks, I’d like to take a moment to salute a workhorse in my personal technology stable — my iPod. Since 1998, this little beauty has been humming along with the same battery (!) on ski days, backpacking trips, trail runs, bike rides, and cross-country flights. It carries over 4,000 songs hand-curated, primarily from the (ahem) Boulder Public Library. It helps me save the battery life on my iPhone and keeps me in music when I’m out of reach for Pandora or Spotify. Yes, the Amazon Echo is amazing, but the content on my old iPod still has value, and there’s still a place for it in my multi-tiered music strategy. You have to appreciate technology that just works.

Top Three Reasons Not To Believe The Deduplication Appliance Datasheets: Reason #2

For years, the main performance indicators for purpose built backup appliances have been the “ingest performance.” The maximum performance published on most vendors’ datasheets are the highest backup rates that the appliance can achieve in a very controlled environment. Usually, these rates are achieved starting with no data on the appliance, so that there is no deduplication occurring. Here again, there are a number of factors that influence the maximum ingest performance. These include how much redundancy is in the data being backed up, the number of backup servers and streams, and the age of the system.

Top Three Reasons Not to Believe the Deduplication Appliance Datasheets: Reason #1

Quantum has been providing storage and backup solutions for over 30 years — and we consider ourselves to be specialists in this market. Nonetheless, we do not control the rules of our own market (or its marketing). Bigger generalist players with unlimited marketing budgets often bend the rules, not always in the interest of customers. Here are three reasons not to believe everything they tell you in the deduplication appliance datasheets.

An (Ironic) Example of Massive Unstructured Data Growth

So here’s some irony for you. We’re getting ready to make a major announcement next week about some new products that will help our customers manage massive unstructured data growth. We were at a studio last week filming our keynote, and it dawned on me that it was a good example of exactly the type of problem we’re helping customers solve. By the way, if you want to watch the keynote this Wednesday, October 12 at 8:30am PT, click here.

How the Public is Helping Law Enforcement with Crime Prevention

Technological change is redefining efficiency in many use cases, from retail to health care, and government to city surveillance. With the availability of new devices that can capture large amounts of data, one particular use case has begun aggregating video content at a rapidly increasing rate — law enforcement. The proliferation of body-worn cameras imposed by government mandates is adding to the many camera streams coming from police car dashboards, interview rooms, and sally ports that provide valuable insight to law enforcement agencies.

Cameras Everywhere. How to Manage the Data?

If I start off my morning saying “excuse me” to a robot, I know it’s not going to be a business-as-usual day. That was my welcome to ASIS 2016 in Orlando. The robot I brushed past, from Knightscope, was autonomously patrolling the entry of the convention center with an array of cameras and sensors, but thankfully no weapons (it looked more like R2-D2 than RoboCop). What struck me was how quickly I grew accustomed to the idea of robots strolling the hallway, observing and reporting. (I shouldn’t get too casual about it — one recently ran over a toddler in a mall.) But it was also a vivid example of how the Internet of Things (IoT) is so quickly becoming an accepted part of our everyday lives.

Load More